Tag Archives: X’s & O’s

Film Study: How Pro Ready was Cleveland Browns Cornerback Denzel Ward?

Before breaking down Denzel Ward, I’ve included links to a few of my favorite X’s & O’s resources. Each book has greatly influenced the way in which I think about the game of football. No matter what side of the ball you are on, you will find a TON of common sense, usable information in each. Great knowledge, great writing, and great coaches!

 

As the fourth overall pick in the 2018 NFL draft, cornerback Denzel Ward enters the NFL with sky-high expectations.

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Getting Vertical with the Smash/Post Concept

The following post is an excerpt from a comprehensive look at Hue Jackson’s favorite pass concepts at the OBR. Click here for the entire article.

Our final route concept is known as the ‘Smash-Post’. The play design integrates another coaching-favorite, the ‘Smash’ concept, with a post route coming from the opposite side of the field. Like the previous ‘Shakes’ concept, ‘Smash-Post’ is a split-safety killer.

Before putting the routes together, let’s look at each individually to see how the combination stresses the two-deep safeties.

‘Smash’ is the classic split-safety beater, consisting of a short in-breaking route like a hitch or fin from the #1 receiver and a corner route from the #2 receiver (should sound familiar to the hitch/corner in ‘Snag’). The play works best against the Tampa 2 (two-deep, zone-under), as it puts the flat defender (the cornerback) in a bind by creating a vertical stretch using the hitch and corner routes. Jump the hitch and the corner route will be thrown over his head against a safety that has to cover the distance from hash-to-sideline. Sink to cushion the corner route and the quarterback will throw the high-percentage hitch in front of the cornerback with opportunity for yards after catch. In this case, the short bait route is run as a flat by the tight end. The specific short route doesn’t matter here; as long as it breaks in front of the cornerback he still faces a vertical stretch.

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